Choosing Forgiveness

If you are looking for a particular article and cannot find it, I have most likely changed the status to private. I have chosen to practice forgiveness.

 

Join me?

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Choosing Forgiveness

  1. Jeffrey N

    Hi Honora,

    Congratulations on completing your degree, you worked hard for it and from the back of your truck that makes you special. You deserve good Karma for the rest of your life!. I enjoy reading your WordPress you always have cool things to say. My last reply to you had grammar errors everywhere and I wasn’t happy about it. So why do I find an explanation necessary, because I have yet to encounter a good writer who has poor grammar. Good writers are conscientious about their grammar for the same reason an artist cares about the material they want to paint on; canvas, wood, etc. or blending colors with their paints. Similarly, good golfers such as myself care about their frame of concentration before striking the ball, what club to use how to spin the ball. If I’m trying to create a feeling I neglect some grammar to meet that. Or try to shortcut my point across in a technically incorrect way I can do that too. These writing tools are not the only useful way to write but for the gifted writers like yourself who are reading my replies, I need to be more mindful and respectful and check my grammar and spelling.

    Your poem, Gaslit: A phenomenological poem in three parts. I found intriguing and good. Part 2 was my favorite it had me laughing. And I love the part you wrote:
    “to guide myself on this untrodden path,
    to pass safely through shadows
    of hungry lionesses
    and stones thrown by angry giants
    larger than reality.”
    So good!
    I never heard the word phenomenological until I looked it up.

    Also, your article “A Conversation with [People Who Claimed to Be] Human Traffickers” having read it was like watching a documentary. I’m Astounded that you are able to compose so much data. But my favorite part is the picture of you presumably hiking the backcountry or somewhere on a Yosemite trail blending perfectly into the surrounding environment with the hat made of color grays and greens and rust. Patagonia apparel company should hire you to model. Yes, it’s most definitely my favorite picture.

    This poem is one of mine and I’m still waiting for the Spirits to give it a name.
    Honora isn’t there special energy that comes from within our souls to be able to express these thoughts on paper.

    ” Untitled ”
    Yes, I walked in the valley with the nameless, name
    And I kindled my fire by the silent stream
    And the shadows reached out and called my name
    You are here; you are here; you are here

    And the gray grew grayer and turned to black
    As the darkness thickend against the bank
    And the blackend stream flowed swiftly by
    Not a ripple, not a gleam, not a shaft of light

    The flame grew feeble as the mist rolled in
    The dampness driving the heat away
    The ember reddened, then turned to gray
    And black in black grew the night

    J.N. 12-9-2018

    Your Fan,
    Jeff
    PM

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Jeff. That is a lovely poem. 🙂 It has a nice flow to it and beautiful imagery. I also had to look up the word “phenomenology” when I learned it. An old friend and literature connoisseur said one of my poems—the Gaslit section about The Valley—was phenomenological. I realized that much of my philosophy revolves around phenomenology, in how I see the world and translate it into writing.

      The Human Trafficker article was based off of eight years of research and hours/weeks/months of research time over the course of those eight years—which came after three weeks of phone calls, averaging six hours a night, with those people. It was research on what I would call the most unpleasant topic in the world—it was not easy to do. Looking into it was disturbing but also necessary because it needed to be exposed. A big red flag was the fact that they continued to harass and threaten me into silence; the fact that they were concerned about being exposed meant something, and I believe that to be silent is to be complicit. I was glad to get it all down in a comprehensible format and available to the public. Blogs are great for presenting data, I have come to find.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.